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museumnacht 2015: margret wibmer, time out

Oude Kerk, Amsterdam, November 7th, 2015   /  19:00 – 02:00

 

‘An artist who develops a work involving its viewers as actors always has something specific in mind for the person who will experience it even if the invitation seems to be open-ended. Wibmer has asked us to experience the church through the sensual, and this can be connected to the spiritual. Transforming the entire church interior into a kind of mise-en-scène, she encourages the visitors to be more aware of their own presence and the presence of those around them in a nonreligious meditation that interrupts daily life. The striking images of bodies at rest on the church floor, the sound of the organ being played as slowly as possible, the willed silence, and a slowly cooling body temperature prompt the mind, through the senses, to contemplate an elastic temporality, long after having left the church.’ [ from the essay indivisible parts of a totality‘ written by Marianna Maruyama]

 

Concept, art direction and garments: Margret Wibmer

Event production: Kim Evers

Project assistants: Rei Kakiuchi, Nell Berger, Malaya Wibmer, Lou Etoundi Menanga, Anna Baumgart, Gerry Wisman

Photography: Desiré van den Berg

Video: Florian Krepcik

Writers: Marianna Maruyama, Jing-Jing Lee

Organist: Jacob Lekkerkerker

+ specials thanks to all volunteers

 

Time Out was made possible through generous support of : Stichting Vrienden van de Oude Kerk, N8, Tijl Fonds, Stichting Stokroos, Austrian Embassy and Villgrater Natur.

 

poem by jing-jing lee

 

feedback participants

 

 

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TIME OUT during Museumnacht at Oude Kerk on November 7th 2015 in the middle of Amsterdam’s Red Light District………….

 

 

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the first vistors arrived at 7 pm…………….

 

 

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checked in their coats and personal belongings at the cloakroom……..

 

 

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prepared to be part of a performance they will never experience again ……………..

 

 

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meanwhile the church was filling up with more visitors……….

 

 

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the crew inside the dressing area getting ready to welcome participants………………..

 

 

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taking a peek into the dressing area from the outside…………

 

 

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after a bit of a wait on line, finally sitting down to be equipped with legwarmers which were part of the outfit……

 

 

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 participants were being helped into a warm and soft woolen overcoat by friendly project assistants…………

 

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after being provided with a mat they made their way onto the church floor………..

 

 

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accompanied by a project assistant, participants were choosing their own place to lie down…….

 

 

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for as long as they wished………

 

 

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At 11.10 organist Jacob Lekkerkerker started to play a part of John Cage’s piece for organ titled ‘as slow as possible’

 

 

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while some spectators tried to document the performance……

 

 

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more visitors arrived…

 

 

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We had more than 2000 visitors during the night. An amazing crew of more than 30 project assistants and volunteers made sure that all ran smoothly.

 

More project documentation will be published soon!

 

all images above: Desiré van den Berg

 

 

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EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW on OCTOBER 31st 2015

 

 

 

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Margret Wibmer’s performance Time Out, as the title of the work suggests, invites us to interrupt daily routines, pause for a moment, and form our own reasons for taking time or making it. The intervention is uncomplicated: visitors are invited to wear a robe-like garment covering their clothes, and choose a place in the church to lie down for as long as they wish.

 

 

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The garment, designed and individually handcrafted by the artist, signifies a transition into another mode and works as a protective medium between the wearer, the space and any onlookers. The process of taking time begins with dressing and the robe must be carefully adjusted to fit the wearer’s body.

 

On a formal level Time Out plays with a shift in spatial relations. It shifts subjectivity by changing perspective and orientation – allowing viewers to be on the ground looking up at the ceiling and, in other moments, standing above bodies at rest as they merge with the ground.

 

 

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Wibmer breaks open new questions through the convergence of the horizontal and vertical: What does the invitation to lie flat on a sacred space mean? How does it work as a gentle act of resistance? Horizontality, achieved every day when we sleep, becomes a socially significant act when it is performed in public. As the horizontal form becomes absorbed within the high ceilings of the church, it resists the endless rush of productivity and speed. This performance is to be taken up on one’s own terms and in one’s own time, acting as an important reminder to make a more livable relationship with time.
The performance will run continuously from 7pm on Saturday until 2am on Sunday. The 45 garments will be rotating among all visitors who want to wear one.

 

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photographs preview © Studio Margret Wibmer

 

 

   

 

Screenshot 2015-09-21 17.49.24

 

 

 

 

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EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW on OCTOBER 31st 2015
for Vrienden van de Oude Kerk and sponsors

 

 

MIRACLES DO Still Occur… What happened during this weekend, when I saw my beloved Oude Kerk spire, ‘hanging’ in a beautiful blanket of fog. She was my destination on Saturday; and there I met the Austrian artist Margret Wibmer, together with the Friends of this amazing, gothic Beauty. And all of us, some 50, performed in her art project TIME OUT.. All of us, and ahead of todays “All Souls’ Day”, spent over an hour on top of our favourite tombstone (mine: central aisle, nr 190), and in the quiet company of several souls underneath. I was with the Van Braam family and in particular with Andreas Everardus van Braam Houckgeest, this travelling “American”, who was the last “European” (also!) to pay his respects to that Chinese Emperor Qianlong, and his Old China of 1795 – when this monarch was exactly 60 years on the throne. So last Saturday, in this one hour of silence and in my warm, black robe and cap… I also travelled across the globe to that, then vast terra incognito of the Chinese empire. And back, several times, just like Andreas, and also our King Willem-Alexander, in China, last week (images: 2/3/4, Herbert rising from Andreas’ grave). While I was travelling & thinking… I heard the incredibly, silvery sounds of young Angels.. there were two, one French and one Russian – and so funny: two tiny Putti, and.. both called Lilly. Look.. listen ! It happened on 31 October in the Red Light of Amsterdam, inside this amazing space. It was indeed a miracle (you’ll agree)

 

Herbert van Hasselt

 

*****

 

saenredam, piranesi en dibbets kwamen langs; pilaren leken horizontaal in de ruimte te hangen, gewelven zweefden langzaam naar beneden, hierarchie tussen boven en onder verdween.

ik voelde me als een diepzeeduiker, gewichtloos (en dat terwijl ik op een keiharde koude steen lag…).
en wat een onbeschrijfelijk mooi licht.

 

Koeno Sluyterman van Loo

 

*****

 

Text below: excerpts from ‘taking time as an act of resistance’ by Marianna Maruyama

 

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Margret Wibmer’s performance Time Out, as the title of the work suggests, invites us to interrupt daily routines, pause for a moment, and form our own reasons for taking time or making it. The intervention is uncomplicated: visitors are invited to wear a robe-like garment covering their clothes, and choose a place in the church to lie down for as long as they wish.

 

DSC_0209-copy

 

 

DSC_0237-copy

 

 

DSC_0362-copy

 

The garment, designed and individually handcrafted by the artist, signifies a transition into another mode and works as a protective medium between the wearer, the space and any onlookers. The process of taking time begins with dressing and the robe must be carefully adjusted to fit the wearer’s body.

 

On a formal level Time Out plays with a shift in spatial relations. It shifts subjectivity by changing perspective and orientation – allowing viewers to be on the ground looking up at the ceiling and, in other moments, standing above bodies at rest as they merge with the ground.

 

DSC_0216-copy

 

Wibmer breaks open new questions through the convergence of the horizontal and vertical: What does the invitation to lie flat on a sacred space mean? How does it work as a gentle act of resistance? Horizontality, achieved every day when we sleep, becomes a socially significant act when it is performed in public. As the horizontal form becomes absorbed within the high ceilings of the church, it resists the endless rush of productivity and speed. This performance is to be taken up on one’s own terms and in one’s own time, acting as an important reminder to make a more livable relationship with time.

 

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All photographs above © Studio Margret Wibmer

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